Thursday, May 31, 2007

New e-mail address

Instead of sending out a mass e-mail, I just thought I'd let everyone know on here about my new email address (see the 'suggestions' link in the sidebar).

The old one will still be in use (at least once they reset the bandwidth at the end of the month), but from now on, my primary correspondence will be through the new Gmail address..

Lately, with all the e-mails I've been getting, I've nearly used up all of my space on the original Fastmail address and already overshot my bandwidth limits on it. So unfortunately, until they reset the bandwidth, I won't be able to send or receive any e-mails from that address..

I never expected that I'd get this much mail through this blog, so a big thanks to all the people who have and continue to give me feedback.

My apologies to anyone who has tried to e-mail me in the past couple of days, only to have it bounce back.. Hopefully this will no longer be an issue.

Thanks..

-T

CATEGORIES: MISCELLANEOUS

Thursday, May 24, 2007

Have a Cocktail.. Upcoming Disco Compilations (June 2007)

It's been a little while since I've posted about upcoming disco collections and reissues. I know I've missed quite a few, but with not just one, but three intriguing, creatively compiled compilations coming up, I figure there was no better time for another one than now..

Anyway, these compilations are due to be released around the 5th of June, or at least more or less around the beginning of June, depending on where you are.. Update: Amazon.com now lists the Dimitri CD as being released on June 19th. Amazon UK still lists June 4th, however..

Update #2 (6/16/07): Added info. on the new Sheila & B. Devotion "Disco Years" compilation..
Update #3 (7/6/07): Added more info. on the new Sheila & B. Devotion "Disco Years" compilation, this time about the double-CD edition..


Dimitri From Paris Presents Cocktail Disco (2007, BBE)
buy/pre-order @ dustygroove.com | amazon.com | amazon.co.uk | cduniverse.com
It seems that suave, jet-setting disco connoisseur extraordinaire, Dimitri from Paris, has done it once again.. The amount of rarities on the tracklist is pleasantly surprising, to say the least. Not to mention the artwork, which looks absolutely stunning. Though really, one can't expect anything less from a Dimitri compilation. Rest assured, unlike one of the more disco compilations he was involved with, Super Disco Friends (with DJ Muro), this collection is not a mix, but a completely unmixed collection of either full, original versions or rare 12" mixes. Although I've only been collecting for a relatively short time, even some of the more seasoned collectors I've come across manage to get a pleasant surprise or two from a Dimitri set.. Out of all of the tracks on here, there are only two that I know of: "Frenesi" by The Ritchie Family and "It's Got To Be Love" by Darcus (which also involves The Ritchie Family's namesake, Richie Rome), and I didn't even know there was a seven minute 12" version of the Darcus track..

Evidently this double disc set can probably be described as Dimitri's take on disco's still relatively unexplored (at least as far as these sorts of compilations go) 'sleaze' subgenre. There's a thread on discomusic.com and an installment of Joe.My.God's Instant Disco History which both give a good outline of it.. For the record though, Dimitri's own background info describes his affinity for sleaze as well as his own 'cocktail disco' approach this way:
One of many such sub genres I grew up to love over the years, is a type of Disco that I could best describe as Cocktail Disco.... I believe this style was called Sleaze back in its days, from roughly 1976 to 1979. There were even DJs specialized in the Sleaze sound which was usually played after hours, in spots with a strong sex oriented drive...Cocktail Disco has that ubiquitous 4/4 beat and flying open high hat, complemented by rich orchestrations, campy over the top vocals, and an often tropical latin vibe. Something that wouldn't feel out of place in a broadway musical..

Judging from the rarity of the selections however, I'm sure this will be less of a trip down memory lane, and more of a journey through relatively unexplored territory with Dimitri's own personal take on this sub-genre..

Although whenever a set so focused on rarities comes along, there's bound to be a bit of skepticism as to whether the tracks themselves are actually quality selections and not just gratuitous collections of obscurities.. For what it's worth though, I've been told by a few people with advance copies that Cocktail Disco does indeed deliver on rarity, quality and concept.. Judging from The Determined Dillettante's tasty lil' teaser and from the tracks that I do know of, I certainly think this'll be one awesome collection!

Anyway, in case you can't tell by now, I'm pretty excited for this and hope to do a review when I finally get myself a copy... For more info, check BBE's website as well as Dimitri's own Myspace blog where both the tracklist along with Dimitri's own liner notes/annotations have been posted..
DIMITRI FROM PARIS' OFFICIAL MYSPACE
BBE - DIMITRI FROM PARIS PRESENTS COCKTAIL DISCO 2XCD
DIMITRI FROM PARIS @ DISCOGS



Disco Deutschland Disco: Disco, Funk & Philly Anthems from Germany 1975-1980 (2007, Marina)
buy/pre-order @ dustygroove.com | amazon.com | amazon.de | amazon.co.uk | cduniverse.com
Brought to you by Stefan Kassel and the people at the Marina label (who were also behind the compilation series, "The In-Kraut"), is this interesting set of euro-rarities from Germany. Given that some of the best and boldest examples of euro-disco came from Germany, it's about time someone did this.. Judging from the label's release notes, many of these tracks are on CD for the first time. Although some of these tracks might be more familiar then others, like say Amanda Lear's "Fashion Pack," Giorgio Moroder/Munich Machine's "Get On The Funk Train," Silver Convention, James Last and Supermax; others like Su Kramer, Carsen Bohn's Bandstand, Christian Anders, Ganymed and pretty much everything else is practically unknown to me. Although that probably doesn't say very much aside from the fact my knowledge of German disco doesn't go too far beyond the big names.. Nevertheless though, this sounds yet another intriguing, eclectic journey through some new disco frontiers..
MARINA RECORDS @ MYSPACE
DISCO DEUTSCHLAND DISCO CD @ DISCOMUSIC.COM
DISCO DEUTSCHLAND DISCO CD @ FUSION3



Grand 12-Inches 4 (2007, Sony)
buy/pre-order @ cduniverse.com | amazon.com | amazon.co.uk
This is the latest volume in Ben Liebrand's series of epic 4-disc collections of disco and dance classics from the 70s and beyond.. I'm sure by now I'm one of the few disco enthusiasts left out there who doesn't yet have at least one volume of Liebrand's series.. And really, with the variety and quality of selections on all of them, and not being broke these days, I really have no excuse. Given how difficult it can be to track down original (and usable) masters, especially for disco (given how many compilations often end up being mostly vinyl transfers); Liebrand's attention to tracking down original masters for the best sound quality is admirable, to say the least. Although not nearly as focused on rarities as the previous two, you just can't lose with a healthy selection of well-known winners and underground classics in their full 12'' form which one would be hard-pressed to find elsewhere, or on CD form at all for that matter.. For more info (tracklist/annotations for all four volumes), check Ben Liebrand's website.. After getting this, I'll probably have to catch up on the other volumes..
GRAND 12 INCHES (4 CD) @ DISCOGS
GRAND 12 INCHES 2 (4 CD) @ DISCOGS
GRAND 12 INCHES 3 (4 CD) @ DISCOGS



Sheila & B. Devotion - The Disco Singles (2007, Warner)
buy/pre-order single CD edition @ amazon.fr | amazon.co.uk | amazon.com
buy/pre-order double CD edition @ amazon.fr | amazon.co.uk | amazon.com
(Added 5/16/07): Apparently following up on the reissue of her excellent Chic-produced album, "King Of The World," on the 11th, Warner France put out this collection covering her disco period, including selections from her first disco album, "Singin' In The Rain" (or "Love Me Baby" as it was also known) at the beginning of the CD and, of course, some of the Chic-produced selections at the end.. In between though, there are some interesting disco singles of hers that I've never heard in full before and that apparently never appeared on any of her albums. Titles like "No No No No" "Hôtel De La Plage," "You Light My Fire" (which also appeared on Vol. 6 of Rhino's "Disco Years" series and more recently on YouTube) "Seven Lonely Days" (a cover of the country classic, recast as a rip-off of Amii Stewart's "Knock On Wood") and their respective B-sides: "Tender Silence Of The Night," "I Don't Need A Doctor," "Gimme Your Loving," and "Sheila Come Back." Although personally, the tracks I've heard from her first disco record can't compare to her Chic-produced stuff, putting them together with the visuals and choreography on YouTube though, they're quite possibly some of the most amusing, enjoyable pieces of disco cheese out there..
Update (7/6/07): I just found out that this compilation comes in both a single CD edition and a 2-CD edition. There's a new set of purchase links above that now go to the double-CD version.. This version spans 30 tracks and includes all the tracks from her Chic-produced album as well as six of the seven tracks off her earlier disco album "Singin' In The Rain"/"Love Me Baby" plus all the single-only releases included in the single CD edition..
SHEILA & B. DEVOTION @ DISCOGS
SHEILA & B. DEVOTION @ RATE YOUR MUSIC
DISCOSAVVY: THE COMPLETE DISCO GUIDE TO SHEILA & B. DEVOTION


CATEGORIES: REISSUES & RELEASES

Saturday, May 19, 2007

Disco Delivery #41:
Táta Vega - Try My Love (1978, Tamla/Motown)



Táta Vega - Get It Up For Love (LP Version)
Táta Vega - Get It Up For Love (12'' Version)
Táta Vega - Come On And Try My Love
Táta Vega - I Just Keep Thinking About You Baby (LP Version)
Táta Vega - I Just Keep Thinking About You Baby (12'' Version)
Táta Vega - Whopper Bopper Show Stopper
Táta Vega - I Need You Now

Carmen Rose AKA 'Táta' Vega (sometimes with the á, sometimes not) was, in my opinion, one of the more unique voices at Motown in the late '70s.. Prior to her Motown days, Tata got her start as part of a group called Pollution, which featured her and Dobie Gray on vocals, and according to at least one source (I wish I had the albums to confirm), future members of Sylvester and The Hot Band, no less. Just to add another dimension of colourful intrigue, Pollution was managed by none other than Max Baer, Jr. of the Beverly Hillbillies fame..

After two albums as part of Pollution, Tata would eventually end up on Motown as part of another group called Earthquire, who had released one album on Motown's Natural Resources imprint. Needless to say, she wasn't exactly a newcomer to the label or to the industry upon the release of her debut album "Full Speed Ahead" (1976, Tamla/Motown). Though despite releasing four albums as a soloist on Motown's Tamla imprint, apparently she wouldn't rack up any real massive hits with them, yet she still put out some excellent material during her time at the label. Judging from the chart positions on the All Music Guide, this album, "Try My Love" would have likely been her most commercially successful record and, in my opinion, right along with "Totally Tata," (1977, Tamla/Motown) perhaps the best out of her Motown albums..

Before really getting to the album, however, I can't go any further without paying some special attention to Tata's voice.. This was the first album of hers that I ever got and I have to say, there was just a certain something about her voice.. Something that managed to be both endearing and captivating, yet also somewhat odd at the same time. Initially, my first impression was that it reminded me of a higher, slightly nasal Chaka Khan.. I'm likely not the first to make the Chaka Khan comparison, but just to take that a little further, another way to look at it would probably be like a cross between Chaka and then Motown labelmate Teena Marie. A voice with the soulful warmth and commanding power of a Chaka Khan, combined with the spunkiness of Teena Marie, among other things. My own lazy comparisons aside though, beyond all other things, there was just a certain charming, soulful sweetness to Tata's voice that was truly all her own. It's one of the things which made this album particularly satisfying, with the material on here showcasing it beautifully, from the cover shots and into the grooves, perfectly zeroing in on that soulful, powerful sweetness..

Taking on uptempo, soulful R&B, sublime balladry, a touch of playful funk along with some great uplifting and sexy disco; with it's diverse, high-quality, accessible material, it seemed like one of those albums that was specially engineered to garner a hit or two. Yet even if it didn't break her through like Motown execs might have expected, it's an album which remains thoroughly enjoyable, not so much because of any unifying concept, but because all the songs were of such a high quality and with Tata bringing so much personality to them, they all end up sounding excellent.. Like all her other Motown records, this album was primarily produced by Winston Monseque, although I believe this is the only one largely co-produced and arranged by former Rufus drummer (Chaka connection number two!) and future Mr. Natalie Cole, André Fischer, whose credited on much of the album. On that note, this album, along with Brenda Russell's first album, are both notable for being among Fischer's first production credits..

The two major standouts on the album, especially from a disco perspective would have to be, without a doubt, "Get It Up For Love" and "Just Keep Thinking About You Baby." Both tracks were evidently released in the US on a double A-side 12'' single, with both recieving special disco mixes. To me, both tracks are not only some of Tata's best, but definitely among some of the best disco Motown was putting out at this time. "..Just Keep Thinking About You Baby," is just simply one of those immediately infectious, dare you-not-to-hum-along kind of songs. One of those grooves which is practically bursting with such pure, unadulterated happiness and joy, one can't help but feel free and happy inside just listening to it.. The rich, layered production with the strings, horns and piano in the mix and that awesome drum track right up front make this an energetic, soulful, veritable disco tour-de-force, especially when the strings punctuate the mix and start to take part of the melody towards the end.. Topping it all off, Tata herself is outstanding on this track, with her lively, dynamic performance, especially with some of those 'how'd-she-do-that?' vocal ad-libs both matching and enhancing the fullness and energy of the song, note-for-note..

The 12'' version extends the track by around a minute and a half giving it a slightly longer intro and a nice instrumental break two-thirds of the way through, with the whole thing punctuated by a bigger, fatter bass drum. Just for maximum dancefloor impact, the bass drum is even further augmented at one point with some deep, overlayed synth effects (which are on the LP version as well, just louder on here), making the beat practically bounce out of the mix.. Overall though, it's still a rather conservative remix, yet it ably does the job enhancing just a few key elements to give things a bit of extra presence..

Years later, in 2001, Gloria Gaynor would do a cover version of this, which was released as a single and included on her last album, "I Wish You Love" (2002, Logic/BMG). She would end up having a #1 Billboard club hit with it, but with all due respect to Gloria, her version, although good in it's own right, can't touch Tata's spirited rendition here..

The other big disco track on the album, Ned Doheny's "Get It Up For Love," was one that had made the rounds somewhat during the late 70's.. Prior to this release, versions had also been done by the likes of Doheny himself, David Cassidy, Ben E. King and the Average White Band among others, yet out of all of the others I've heard so far, in my opinion, Tata's has got to be one of the best. Produced by Monseque and Fischer, Tata's version is propelled by an instantly catchy synth refrain and further augmented by those sublime arrangements featuring those airy synth sounds; richly textured, galloping percussion and a dynamic, supple bassline. Overall, there's a definite sexiness and sensuality to this version which, combined with it's energetic, irresistable danceablilty, turns it into an absolute disco scorcher..

One of my favourite parts of the album version is that part in the middle when it plays a little trick on the listener with that surprise fade-out.. Just when you think it's all over, it fades right back into a tasty synth break giving prime exposure to that hypnotic synth refrain and frenzied synth solo. Another absolutely killer moment in this song which also deserves some appreciation is when Tata sings the line: "you can flee in terror, you can stay and fight, you can stand in line and scream it's.. just..not..right, baby.." With that perfect, gritty emphasis on "scream", her vocals are just so absolutely on-point here..

Interestingly, the 12'' version, at around 5.49, is actually shorter than the album version, which is just over six minutes. Again, a fairly conservative remix with the main difference being that the 12'' mix takes out that little surprise fadeout in the middle, giving it a much more steady, focused danceable dynamic..

Just to make another Chaka Khan connection, the writer, Ned Doheny had also co-written (along with the Average White Band's Hamish Stuart) one of my favourite Chaka singles: "What Cha' Gonna Do For Me," from her '81 album of the same name..

Aside from the two big disco tracks, I also had to include some of the other uptempo tracks as well, namely the bright album opener "Come On And Try My Love" which, quite appropriately, makes the perfect showcase for the sweet warmth of her vocals; as well as a little funky moment from side two, "Whopper Bopper Show Stopper." The latter track is easily one of the funkiest, quirkiest, most enjoyable things she's ever put her name to. Given that "Whopper Bopper Show Stopper" is also the title to Motown labelmate Junior Walker's 1976 Motown album and given, as well, the penchant for Motown artists to cover each other's material from time to time, I'm guessing Tata's version is perhaps not the only one.. Either way, hell if I actually know what the damn song's about anyway, but as usual, Tata totally turns this one out with a fun, spunky vocal..

Lastly, I also had to include a great R&B track off side one, "I Need You Now," written by legendary classic Motown writers Brian and Eddie Holland. Driven by that great piano and Tata's powerful, heartfelt vocals; melodically speaking, it's beautiful and brilliant in it's own humble way and is, at least to me, one of the hidden gems off this album..

After this, Tata would end up doing only one more album for Motown, "Givin' All My Love" (1981, Tamla/Motown). According to her: "...after about nine years with Motown, a Motown executive told me I was too old, too fat, and that my career as a recording artist for the label was washed up.." and with that, evidently her career as a Motown artist came to an end. Although her Motown period would remain the most prolific for her as a soloist, one of her biggest moments was yet to come.. Even if her name isn't instantly recognizable to many people, her voice would be featured quite prominently on the Quincy Jones-produced soundtrack to "The Color Purple," where Tata provided the singing voice for Margaret Avery's character. It's been so long since I've seen the movie, I can barely remember it, but hearing her on a tracks like "Miss Celie's Blues (Sister)" and "Maybe God Is Trying To Tell You Something," her performances on the soundtrack are easily one of the high points in her career, showcasing her voice and abilities like nothing else before..

Although she had dabbled in Christian music on her Motown albums (ie. "Try God," "Come In Heaven, Earth Is Calling"), later into the 80's after her departure from the label, she would start collaborating with contemporary gospel pioneer Andraé Crouch who, in her words "took me in when I had no place to go".. After battling a crack addiction in the mid 80's, Tata would end up committing herself even more fully to Christian music and faith..

In a very revealing interview with Today's Christian Woman magazine in 2000, Tata chronicled some of her life experiences and how she, to quote the article, "..had found hope and healing from her painful past." If anything, after reading about her struggles with, among other things, rape, self-esteem and drug addiction, the woman's certainly led one hell of a life.. Although I'm hardly a religious person, and despite my own reservations about elements of Christianity, one can't help but empathize with her after reading her story; that in spite of everything she's gone through, she finally seems to have found healing and a sense of peace in her life..

Since leaving Motown, Tata's only recorded a couple of albums to her name, "Time's So Right" in 1988 and most recently, a gospel album in the late '90s on Quincy Jones' Qwest label called "Now I See" (1998, Qwest/Warner Bros.).. Aside from her own albums, since the 1980's and even into more recent years, she's also become a pretty prolific background/session vocalist, appearing on albums by the likes of Pat Benatar, Melissa Manchester, Patti Austin, Patti LaBelle, and Elton John, just to name a few.

Unfortunately, Motown/Universal have yet to release any compilations or album reissues of Tata's recordings. Given some of her excellent material at Motown, hopefully that omission will be rectified in the near future.. On the bright side, "Totally Tata" was recently reissued on CD in 2005 by the P-Vine label in Japan, where they seem to get all the good stuff..

Despite being relatively under-represented on CD, the full 12" versions of Tata's "Get It Up For Love" and "..Just Keep Thinking About You.." have both found their way to CD at different times.. "I Just Keep Thinking About You Baby" appeared on the now out-of-print compilation "Funkology, Volume Three: Dance Divas" (1996, Motown/PolyGram) and "Get It Up For Love" currently appears on the excellent (and highly recommended) double-disc set, "Motown Disco" (2005, Motown/Universal), which was exceptionally compiled by the very cool people over at Six Million Steps..

These days, Tata has apparently signed with a label called Do Rite Records, so it seems there's a possibility of some new material on the way. If anyone's interested, you can hear and read more about Tata on her official Myspace page.

To sum things up, no matter what the woman sings, be it R&B, disco, gospel or whatever, there's a quality in Tata's voice which never fails to capture and convey a certain uplifting joy. Even on a track like "I Need You Now," there's this twinge of endearing optimism and sweetness to her voice which ultimately always shines through. It's a quality which is well showcased on the album and a perfect fit for the kind of uptempo, uplifting disco which it featured.. Anyway, until next time, enjoy these tracks..

LINKS:
TÁTA VEGA - TRY MY LOVE LP @ DISCOGS
TÁTA VEGA - I JUST KEEP THINKING ABOUT YOU BABY/GET IT UP FOR LOVE 12'' @ DISCOGS
TÁTA VEGA - I JUST KEEP THINKING ABOUT YOU BABY/GET IT UP FOR LOVE 12'' @ DISCOMUSIC.COM
TÁTA VEGA @ ALL MUSIC GUIDE
TÁTA VEGA @ SOULWALKING
TÁTA VEGA'S OFFICIAL MYSPACE
TODAY'S CHRISTIAN WOMAN: AMAZING GRACE - AN INTERVIEW WITH TÁTA VEGA (BY GINGER E. MACFARLAND) (JULY/AUGUST 2000)
LOS ANGELES BUSINESS JOURNAL: PURCHASE OF APARTMENTS HAS SWEET SOUND FOR PERFORMERS (TÁTA VEGA INTERVIEW QUOTES) (OCTOBER 23, 2000)
WINSTON MONSEQUE @ DISCOGS
ANDRÉ FISCHER @ DISCOGS
ANDRÉ FISCHER @ ALL MUSIC GUIDE
ANDRÉ FISCHER @ STUDIOEXPRESSO
ANDRÉ FISCHER VIDEO INTERVIEW @ RECORDPRODUCTION.COM

PURCHASE:

VA - MOTOWN DISCO (2 CD)
AMAZON.CO.UK | DUSTY GROOVE | CD UNIVERSE | AMAZON.COM


CATEGORIES: DISCO DELIVERIES, WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO..

Wednesday, May 09, 2007

A moment or two..



Mystery - Hold On To This Moment (Instrumental) (1981, Bump)

Here's a little something that I picked up recently.. A few weeks back, I had a nice sunny day to myself and while on a mid-morning walk, felt the urge to stop into the used record shop. Let's just say that with all the disco 12'' in their new arrivals that day, my wallet was a whole lot lighter once I got home..

Anyway, despite the water damage on the cover, this is undoubtedly one of my best finds lately. Although there is no specific producer credited on this record, the arrangements are credited to none other than ubiquitous Montreal super-producer/arranger Denis LePage who, of course, was one half of the duo Lime, along with his then wife Denyse LePage.

Along with Joe LaGreca (with whom he often co-produced, especially early on), LePage was undoubtedly one of the most prolific producers/arrangers to come out of the Montreal disco scene. Whether as a producer, arranger, writer or player, he must have contributed to dozens of notable records out of the Montreal scene over the years. Aside from Lime, some of the more prominent ones like Carol Jiani and Kat Mandu's "The Break" (both of which were co-produced with Joe LaGreca) come to mind.. In some ways, I'd probably describe LePage and LaGreca's sound as the Canadian equivalent of the sort of things that came out of Patrick Adams and Peter Brown's P&P labels. Although their respective sounds were completely different, one was rooted in R&B and funk, the other in a hybrid of Euro and American sounds; both camps often put out (or contributed to) records with a similarly distinctive indie, lo-fi quality to them (see Carol Jiani's "Hit N' Run Lover" for one example)..

Although on this particular record, LePage and LaGreca aren't specifically credited as producers (the production instead credited, rather anonymously, as a "Brothers United Music Production"), they might as well have been. With the combination of synths, punchy horn arrangements, their signature flat, crashing drums; not to mention that metronomic cowbell and beautiful string section, the track has their sound all over it. Overall, the whole thing ends up sounding similar to that early Lime sound; like a lighter, breezier, more melodic companion piece to Lime's amazing "Agent 406." Despite the fact that the once ubiquitous disco string sections seemed well on their way out by this point, the sheer drama of those string and horn sections are what really make this particular record stand out. Those two elements singlehandedly take the mood and feeling of this record to elegant, dizzying heights in a way that probably wasn't heard very often by this point in the early 80's..

While the instrumental is superb, the vocal version on the other hand (which is actually on the A-side), is unfortunately one of the most awful vocal tracks I've ever heard. Seriously. I'm not exaggerating, it's absolutely wretched... If you don't believe me, go ahead and listen to it for yourself... Just don't say you weren't warned...

Although the vocal may start off relatively decent at the beginning, it only gets progressively worse towards the end. By that point, it just reminds me of really bad karaoke, albeit without the amusement factor. I almost feel bad for the joker trying to 'sing', whoever the hell he is. He not only sounds downright awful, but practically ruins an otherwise good record in the process.. Perhaps in this case, it's a good thing no one was credited for them. Although I was tempted to suggest that maybe the vocalist is Denis LePage himself, it sounds nothing like how he does on the Lime records. LePage's vocals in Lime may have been at times shaky and a little 'rough around the edges,' so to speak, but this guy makes him sound like Elvis in comparison.. In any case, I can only guess that maybe they blew their budget on the string section and couldn't afford a half-decent singer afterwards..

Evidently though, in 1982 this track still managed to get a US release/remix on the then fledgling Tommy Boy label, being what appears to be one of the earliest Tommy Boy releases that I've come across..

The original Canadian release posted here was mixed by the late New York disco DJ veteran Bobby 'DJ' Guttadaro, who also contributed to other notable Canadian disco releases such as Montreal feat. Uchenna Ikejiani and the original 12" of Sparkle Tuhran & Friends' "Handsome Man" to name just a couple. The US Tommy Boy release, however, was remixed by the prolific Mark Berry, who had gotten his start as an in-house producer, mixer and engineer on the Vanguard label on records by Poussez!, Roni Griffith and Alisha to name a few. Although I haven't heard the US remix yet, judging from the reviews on discomusic.com, both sides of the US 12'' evidently kept the vocals on the mix. According to one of those user reviews, the popularity of the Lime sound at the time still managed to get this record some limited club play.

Anyway, vocal version aside, to me, this instrumental version (although fairly brief by disco standards) nonetheless remains a hidden, sparkling (can-con) disco diamond..

PREVIOUS RELATED ENTRIES:
DISCO DELIVERY #35: MONTREAL FEATURING UCHENNA IKEJIANI (1979, SALSOUL) (FEBRUARY 21, 2007)

LINKS:
MYSTERY - HOLD ON TO THIS MOMENT (ORIGINAL 12'') @ DISCOGS
MYSTERY - HOLD ON TO THIS MOMENT (US REMIX 12'') @ DISCOMUSIC.COM
MYSTERY - HOLD ON TO THIS MOMENT (US REMIX 12'') @ DISCOGS
DENIS LEPAGE @ DISCOGS
DENIS LEPAGE @ DISCOMUSIC.COM
DENYSE LEPAGE @ DISCOGS
DARIO'S LIME PAGE
JOE LA GRECA @ DISCOGS
JOE LA GRECA @ DISCOMUSIC.COM
DENYSE LEPAGE @ DARIO'S LIME PAGE
GIORGY'S PLACE- LIME
LIME @ DISCO MUSEUM


CATEGORIES: MINI DELIVERIES, CAN-CON DISCO

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